Tumeric

For more than 5,000 years, turmeric has been an important part of Eastern cultural traditions, including traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda.  Valued for its medicinal properties and warm, peppery flavor, this yellow-orange spice has more recently earned a name for itself in Western medicine as well.
 

Turmeric comes from the root of the Curcuma longa plant, which is native to Indonesia and southern India, and is widely used as an ingredient in curry dishes and yellow mustard.   As research into this powerful spice has increased, it has emerged as one of nature’s most powerful potential healers.

Said Dr. David Frawely, founder and director of the American Institute for Vedic Studies in Santa Fe, New Mexico: 

“If I had only one single herb to depend upon for all possible health and dietary needs,  I would without much hesitation choose the Indian spice Turmeric.  There is little it cannot do in the realm of healing and much that no other herb is able to accomplish.  Turmeric has a broad spectrum of actions, mild but certain effects,  and is beneficial for long-term and daily usage.”
 

Turmeric’s beneficial effects in a nutshell:

Strengthens and improves digestion

  • Reduces gas and bloating
  • Assists in the digestion of protein and with rice and bean dishes
  • Improves your body’s ability to digest fats
  • Promotes proper metabolism, correcting both excesses and deficiencies
  • Maintains and improves intestinal flora
  • Improves elimination of wastes and toxins

Supports healthy liver function and detox

  • Turmeric helps increase bile flow making it a liver cleanser
  • Can rejuvenate your liver cells and recharge their capability to break down toxins
  • Helps to prevent alcohol and other toxins from being converted into compounds that may be harmful to your liver
  • Supports formation of healthy tissue

Purifies your blood

  • Stimulates formation of new blood tissue
  • Anti-inflammatory: Helps to reduce irritation to tissues characterized by pain, redness, swelling and heat

Contains curcuminoids that fight cancer, arthritis, and Alzheimer’s

Curcuminoids are potent phytonutrients (plant-based nutrients) that contain powerful antioxidant properties

  • Counteracts the damaging effects of free radicals in your body
  • Relieves arthritis pain and stiffness, anti-inflammatory agent
  • Anti-carcinogenic: “Curcumin has been shown to prevent a large of number of cancers in animal studies  
  • Laboratory data indicate that curcumin can inhibit tumor initiation, promotion, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis.”[1]
  • Supports treatment of Alzheimer’s disease:  “Because Alzheimer’s disease is caused in part by amyloid-induced inflammation  
  • Curcumin has been shown to be effective against Alzheimer’s

Curcumin: Turmeric’s Active Anti-Inflammatory “Ingredient”
 

Most notably turmeric is known for its potent anti-inflammatory properties,  which come from curcumin — the pigment that gives turmeric its yellow-orange color, and which is thought to be responsible for many of its medicinal effects.
 There are an estimated three to five grams of curcumin in 100 grams of turmeric.
 Curcumin has been shown to influence more than 700 genes, and it can inhibit both the activity and the synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and 5-lipooxygenase (5-LOX), as well as other enzymes that have been implicated in inflammation.[3]
 

Turmeric’s cancer-fighting properties
 

In India where turmeric is widely used, the prevalence of four common U.S. cancers  — colon, breast, prostate and lung — is 10 times lower.  In fact, prostate cancer, which is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in U.S. men, is rare in India and this is attributed, in part, to turmeric.   Numerous studies have looked into this potential cancer-fighting link, with promising results. 
 

For instance, curcumin has been found to:

  • Inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells
  • Inhibit the transformation of cells from normal to tumor
  • Help your body destroy mutated cancer cells so they cannot spread throughout your body
  • Decrease inflammation
  • Enhance liver function
  • Inhibit the synthesis of a protein thought to be instrumental in tumor formation
  • Prevent the development of additional blood supply necessary for cancer cell growth
     

Turmeric’s essential role for your liver
 

Your liver’s primary role is to process and remove toxins carried in your bloodstream.  When functioning at its peak, it can filter up to two liters of blood per minute and easily break apart toxic molecules to reduce their toxicity.  Your liver is also a crucial part of vitamin, mineral, protein, fat, carbohydrate and hormonal metabolism.

However, poor diet, allergens, pollution and stress can cause your liver to become sluggish, and this can impair its vital functions.  This is where turmeric can be a very useful part of your liver support system. 

 Studies have shown that it:

  • May increase important detoxification enzymes in your liver
  • Induces the formation of a primary liver detoxification enzyme, glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes

Turmeric is also a natural cholagogue, a medicinal agent that promotes the discharge of bile from your system.  Increased bile flow is important to help your liver detoxify and to help your body digest fats.
 

Turmeric for Your heart, brain and overall health
 

Turmeric inhibits free radical damage of fats, including cholesterol.  When cholesterol is damaged in this way, or oxidized, it can then damage your blood vessels and lead to a heart attack or stroke.  Therefore, research suggests that turmeric’s ability to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol may be beneficial for your heart.   It’s also rich in vitamin B6, high intakes of which are associated with a reduced risk of heart disease.  Meanwhile, turmeric appears to be highly protective against neurodegenerative diseases. 
 The compound has also proven capabilities of blocking the progression of multiple sclerosis.  Further, Professor Moolky Nagabhushan from the Loyola University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, who has been studying turmeric for the last 20 years, believes that turmeric can protect against harmful environmental chemicals, and in so doing protect against childhood leukemia. 
 The research showed that curcumin in turmeric can:[7]

  • Inhibit the toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)  (cancer-causing chemicals in the environment)
  • Inhibit radiation-induced chromosome damage
  • Prevent the formation of harmful heterocyclic amines and nitroso compounds, which may result in the body when  eating certain processed foods, such as processed meat products
  • Irreversibly inhibit the multiplication of leukemia cells in a cell culture

Turmeric’s volatile oils also have external anti-bacterial action.   As such, they may help prevent bacterial wound infections and accelerate wound healing.
 

Evidence suggests the spice may also be beneficial for:
 

  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Psoriasis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Cataracts
  • Gallstones
  • Muscle regeneration
  • Inflammatory bowel disease

Recipe for assistance with Cancer, Alzheimer’s and Arthritis 
 Take 1/4 tea spoon of tumeric and 1/4 tea spoon of ginger powder add 1/2 tea spoon
of pure honey in cup of warm water. Drink it 2 to 3 times a week.

Cleansing the colon

Things you’ll need:

  • non-chlorinated water
  • Epsom salts
  • Pot
  • Cooking thermometer
  • enema bag
  1. Put 2 quarts of water into a pot
  2. Add 2 tbsp. Epsom salt and stir
  3. Heat the water and salt mixture to 40 degrees celsius, making sure that the salt on the bottom of the pot is fully dissolved
  4. Add the mixture to an enema bag and administer

The salt-and-water mixture will naturally clean the colon without killing the natural flora in the colon.

 Tips & Warnings

  • Boil tap water to rid it of chlorine
  • Administer enema’s only under the direction of your doctor.  Make sure that the water is no hotter than 40 degrees celsius.

Palak Paneer (Spinach and cottage cheese)

Ingredients: 

   

500gms Fresh Palak (Saag)
100gms Paneer
2 Onions grated Ginger, Garlic paste
5-6 tbsp oil
1 tsp pure ghee
Garam masala to taste
Red chili powder to taste
1 tsp cumin powder
Salt To Taste

 How to make sag (palak) paneer:

  • Clean and wash palak (spinach) nicely.

Boil the spinach in water and cool it.

  • Now mash it in a mixer.
  • Heat oil in a kadai. Add ginger-garlic paste and stir-fry for a minute.
  • Now add onions and fry till golden brown.
  • Add all spices except red chilli powder.
  • Now add the spinach (palak) and little water if needed and cook for 4-5 minutes.
  • Cut paneer into pieces (Paneer can be fried to golden brown in a seperate pan or can be used as it is).
  • Add Paneer pieces to the gravy and cook until done.
  • Take out in a bowl.
  • Just before serving, heat pure ghee in a small pan.
  • Hold the pan over bowl, add chili powder and immediately pour on the indian palak paneer.
  • Caution: Don’t allow chili powder to burn .

What is Specialised Kinesiology?

Sometimes we find ourselves in distress.  This is our body’s way of indicating that we are “off track” or not coping in one or more areas of our life.  In other words we need to pay attention to the signals and find a way to adapt and deal with the situation appropriately.

When we are presented with dis-ease symptoms it is a message from the body that we are not living to our full potential and it is time to address those factors that are limiting us.  To address this imbalance kinesiology is used as a method of finding the underlying cause or issue.

Kinesiology as we know it today was originally developed by the American chiropractor Dr John Goodheart in the 1960’s to enhance and improve the quality of his treatments.  Since then it has evolved into many different branches, all based on the scientific, neurological workings of the body.

Definitions

The International Association Of Specialised Kinesiologists (IASK) Definition

“Kinesiology is the science of assessing the energetic systems of a person for balanced function, by using the change of physiological response through the muscular system as feedback. Using this same feedback, Kinesiology identifies any non-invasive treatment strategy to primarily affect and balance the energetic systems of a person for the purpose of promoting, restoring and maintaining health.”

It defines “Specialised Kinesiology as:
“Specialised kinesiology (SK) is a term used to describe the collective activity of all the different types and models of kinesiology that arise from the diverse applications of Kinesiology (muscle testing). SK is any type of Kinesiology that is accredited and recognised according to the categories created by IASK

Muscle Testing

Kinesiology is the organized use of “Muscle Testing” as a verification tool in a series of tests or protocols to achieve a particular end result or goal.  This is how the tool of muscle testing is applied.

Adaption is the ability of all the systems in the person to work together to create changes that suit the desired result in that particular circumstance.  Kinesiology is used to find where and how a person is unable to adapt appropriately.”

The Beginning of Understanding Kinesiology – Andrew Verity

courtesty : http://www.kinesiologysa.co.za/what.asp

Tune in and connect

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